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Boy Lazarus, by Taylor Leigh Harper

Updated: Jul 14


black and white photo of desert plan and hill in background
Vantage Washington 2, by Jeff Corwin

Tell me

who raised you again,

dusted dirt off

your saffron-soured bones?

After your resurrection, you smelled

of peat moss, dirty socks,

lemon-scented Pine-Sol, mud

pies,

cherry-flavoured Chapstick,

something almost like longing, call it

desire,

so what? So I desired you—

after all, the earth moved for you

as your hand broke

through the surface soil, fingers stretching toward

the smog-silver sky and long shadows

cast across the day unfolding. Call it desire,

call it transfiguration, this partnership of sage and

weekly appointments like Freud, you are asked

to cook it chew it eat it bury it,

that loneliness you kept under your tongue so long,

until, when rotting, you relearned to speak:

I am doing well/Things are

going better/It’s fine, I’m

fine/I think I’m finally

feeling like me again.


A haunting, new age ghosting.

When the weeds in that front yard grow,

unbound and newly green,

will you think of me as you did

in the beginning, bearing flesh,

poised and promising to wait hold

on hold wait hold on,

not yet digging at tire tracks left on the asphalt,

up from which sprouts this tiny tomb

the size of your ring finger,

to mark where you had been, where you’d come back

and leave once more?


Taylor Leigh Harper’s writing has appeared or is forthcoming in SPALSH!, Westwind, and The Bridge. She was the recipient of the 2019 Christopher Zyda Creative Writing Prize. She lives in Southern California.

Over the years, Jeff Corwin has taken photos out of a helicopter, in jungles, on oil rigs and an aircraft carrier. Assignments included portraits of famous faces and photos for well-known corporate clients. After 40+ years as a commercial photographer, Corwin has turned his discerning eye to fine art photography, primarily landscape.


Trusting his vision is important to Corwin. He has always kept the same approach, the same discernment and his desire to create photographs grounded in design. Simplicity, graphic forms, strong lines or repeating configurations personally resonate. He cites his mentor Arnold Newman and the works of Piet Mondrian and Edward Hopper as inspiration.


His experience has taught him not to second guess elements like composition or content. Humble shapes, evocative lines. Eliminate clutter. Light when necessary. Repeat.


His commercial work has won many prestigious awards and garnered vast international media coverage. Corwin's career shift into fine art photography is being met with the same serious attention. He is currently exhibiting in several important contemporary galleries throughout the western United States.


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